pkg 01A wearable motion-tracking device called Personal KinetiGraph (PKG) objectively and effectively assesses Parkinson’s-related motor fluctuations, researchers report.

The study, “The role of Personal KinetiGraphTM fluctuator score in quantifying the progression of motor fluctuations in Parkinson’s disease,” was published in Functional Neurology.

The PKG system, developed by Global Kinetics Corporation, is a wrist-worn movement recording device. It collects data on a person’s motor symptoms, including tremors, slowness of movement (bradykinesia), and abnormal involuntary movements (dyskinesia).

PKG watch tremor assessmentThe technology also assesses patients’ motor fluctuations, immobility, and daytime somnolence, or sleepiness. Clinicians also can use it to help study an individual’s likelihood for developing impulsive behaviours, and to collect information on medication compliance.

The device has been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and holds CE certification, meaning it meets EU safety, health, and environmental protection requirements.

Motor fluctuations, including ‘wearing-off’ and dyskinesia, are associated with increased disease severity and disability, and PD [Parkinson’s disease] patients experience decreased quality of life as their response to medical therapy becomes less predictable. Effectively managing motor fluctuations is complicated by the lack of objective assessment tools, leading patients and physicians to rely on direct observation in the clinic or patient reports, which may be unrevealing, incomplete and unreliable,”
Echo E. Tan, MD, neurologist at Cedar-Sinai Medical Center and the study’s lead author, said in a press release.

The researchers noted that “wearable devices transcend language barriers, cognitive barriers, as well as time constraints in the clinic.” That makes this wearable device a useful tool to objectively measure motor fluctuations in Parkinson’s disease.

The results of our study demonstrate that the fluctuation score calculated by the PKG system provides objective quantification of motor fluctuations. This may help improve routine management of PD patients and enable more objective assessments in clinical trials of PD therapies.
Echo Tan

 

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